15-16 January 2015
Institut Henri Poincaré
Europe/Paris timezone

Characterizing New physics with Polarized Beams at High-Energy Hadron Colliders

15 Jan 2015, 12:15
14m
Chair: Jean-Philippe Lansberg, Amphi Hermite (Institut Henri Poincaré)

Chair: Jean-Philippe Lansberg, Amphi Hermite

Institut Henri Poincaré

11, rue Pierre et Marie Curie 75005 Paris

Speaker

Josselin Proudom (LPSC)

Description

## Motivations ## - Status of New Physics searches at the LHC - Why using polarized beams for New Physics searches? - Future Accelerators & Polarized beams ## Physics at polarized hadron colliders ## - Polarized Parton Distribution Functions - Parton luminosities & cross sections - Longitudinal spin asymmetries ## Physics case: Monotop signature ## - Monotop production in the Standard model - Monotop production in the RPV-MSSM - Monotop production in the Hylogenesis model - Monotop production in the X-model ## Conclusions ##

Summary

If new physics has to be discovered in the forthcoming years, the ultimate goal of the high-energy physics program will consist of fully characterizing the newly-discovered degrees of freedom in terms of properties such as their masses, spins and couplings.

I will show how the availability of polarized beams at high-energy proton-proton colliders could yield a unique discriminating power between different beyond the Standard Model scenarios giving the same final-state signature, and how polarized beams could be help us to obtain information on the parameters of the hypothetical new physics sector of the theory. I will discuss as an illustrative example the case of a particular class of models leading to monotop production, and explain how these models could be distinguished by means of single- and double-spin asymmetries in polarized collisions at a Large Hadron Collider operating at a center of-mass energy of 14 TeV and at the recently proposed Future Circular Collider.

Primary author

Co-authors

Benjamin Fuks (CERN/IPHC) Ingo Schienbein (LPSC) Juan Rojo (Rudolf Peierls for Theoretical Physics)

Presentation Materials

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